10 Tips for Saving Your Skin This Summer

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Be Sun Smart

Summertime is all about having fun in the sun, but that fun may come at a price if you don’t protect your skin from dangerous UV rays. Skin cancer is the most common cancer in the U.S., and excessive sun exposure is the most common cause. Taking a few precautions before heading outdoors can be […]

Nicholas Rudloff, DO, dermatologist with Sunflower Dermatology and Medical Day Spa

Dermatologist, Nicholas Rudloff, DO

Summertime is all about having fun in the sun, but that fun may come at a price if you don’t protect your skin from dangerous UV rays. Skin cancer is the most common cancer in the U.S., and excessive sun exposure is the most common cause. Taking a few precautions before heading outdoors can be a lifesaver. Follow these 10 tips to save your skin:

  1. Limit your exposure to the sun when it’s brightest (10 a.m.-4 p.m.).
  2. Use sunscreen with a SPF (sun protection factor) of at least 30.
  3. Apply sunscreen 30 minutes before going outside. Reapply it every two hours.
  4. Spread sunscreen on your nose, ears, neck, hands, the tops of your feet and any bald areas on your scalp.
  5. Use sunscreen year round.
  6. Wear wraparound sunglasses with extended lenses to protect your eyes and surrounding skin.
  7. Choose tightly woven clothing that covers as much skin as possible.
  8. Wear a hat with at least a 6-inch round brim.
  9. Know that some medications boost your sun sensitivity.
  10. Wear lip balm with sunscreen.

“Wearing moisturizer or makeup with SPF isn’t enough,” says Nicholas Rudloff, DO, a dermatologist with Sunflower Dermatology & Medical Day Spa. “Wearing sunscreen every day reduces the risk for skin cancer and prevents signs of skin aging. Even on cloudy days, up to 80% of the sun’s UV rays can penetrate the clouds.”

Do You Know the ABC’s of Skin Cancer?

Skin cancer appears most often on the head, face, neck, hands and arms. A change in the size, shape, color or feel of a mole or an unusual new mole is often the first sign of melanoma, the rarest but deadliest form of skin cancer. When checking your moles, remember your ABCs to spot warning signs. Early detection is essential, so check your moles and birthmarks monthly. Report any change in your skin to your doctor. Don’t wait for pain—skin cancer rarely hurts.

ABCDE Skin Cancer

If you notice any concerning changes in your skin, contact your primary care physician, who can discuss the next step or recommend a dermatologist. If you don’t have a physician, we can help. Call 816.221.HEAL (4325) for a referral.

Jodi Rawson

Jodi Rawson

As the Digital Marketing Coordinator at NKCH, Jodi is responsible for the hospital's online presence including websites, online advertising, social media, this blog and email communications. She believes in strong relationships, data with a side of gut instinct and has a passion for driving engagement.

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